Mind-Controlled Videogames Become Reality

Mind-Controlled Videogames Become Reality

Picture this: You put on a headset and relax your mind. Soon you begin controlling an object with your thoughts.

 

This mind-power trick may seem far-fetched, like something from a late-night science fiction movie or the back of an old comic book. But several companies are bringing this technology to life with affordable headsets that determine a person’s state of mind.

 

The gadgets translate brain waves into digital information and beam it wirelessly to computers or other devices.

 

So far the headsets are confined to mostly digital interfaces—videogames and movies whose plots can be altered with the mind—although in some cases real-world objects have been used, like a pair of catlike ears that move depending on a person’s mood. The technology, still in its infancy, has the potential to not only entertain but to possibly improve education and strengthen mental health, some doctors say.

Online Gaming, Mobile Entertainment And The Land Of Opportunity In Video Game Design

Online Gaming, Mobile Entertainment And The Land Of Opportunity In Video Game Design

Of the seventy-two percent of American households playing computer or video games, fifty-five percent choose to play them on their phones or handheld devices.

Why the Leap Is the Best Gesture-Control System We’ve Ever Tested

Why the Leap Is the Best Gesture-Control System We’ve Ever Tested

Headline says it all. Did I mention gesture is what comes after touch, for interfaces? 🙂

YoYo Games intros GameMaker: Studio for cross-platform game development

YoYo Games intros GameMaker: Studio for cross-platform game development

The tool promises output in native code for iOS, Android, HTML 5, PC and Mac

YoYo Games launches GameMaker: Studio today, a fast and easy to use 2D games development tool that provides for cross-platform output. GameMaker: Studio allows developers to create games in a single code base and then export and run them natively on multiple formats including HTML5, Facebook, Android, iOS, Symbian, Windows and OSX. The software has a drag-and-drop integrated development environment with a built-in games-oriented scripting language that considerably increases games development productivity.

Must-See Video: Gesture Control Accuracy Takes a Huge “Leap” Forward

Must-See Video: Gesture Control Accuracy Takes a Huge “Leap” Forward

Dude! Yeah, it’s must-see. This is the next interface after touch.

It’s more accurate than a mouse, as reliable as a keyboard and more sensitive than a touchscreen…. This isn’t a game system that roughly maps your hand movements. The Leap technology is 200 times more accurate than anything else on the market — at any price point. Just about the size of a flash drive, the Leap can distinguish your individual fingers and track your movements down to a 1/100th of a millimeter.

Neuroscientists develop video game for stroke recovery

Neuroscientists develop video game for stroke recovery

After a stroke, it is often possible — with months of therapy and determination — for the brain to relearn how to control a weakened limb. Finding the resources (therapist, finances, time) can be the bigger hurdle.

Enter Circus Challenge, the first in a coming suite of action video games designed by Newcastle University stroke experts and the new company Limbs Alive to provide extra in-home therapy.

“Eighty percent of patients do not regain full recovery of arm and hand function and this really limits their independence and ability to return to work,” pediatric neuroscience professor Janet Eyre at Newcastle, who set up Limbs Alive to produce the games, said in a news release.

“Patients need to be able to use both their arms and hands for most everyday activities such as doing up a zip, making a bed, tying shoe laces, unscrewing a jar. With our video game, people get engrossed in the competition and action of the circus characters and forget that the purpose of the game is therapy.”

Research: Active Play Video Games May Benefit Children with Cerebral Palsy

Research: Active Play Video Games May Benefit Children with Cerebral Palsy

Children with cerebral palsy (CP) can greatly benefit from playing “active play” video games – as opposed to the kind that don’t require any kind of physical activity. According to researchers from Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital and the University of Toronto.

Children with CP that play traditional games face an even greater risk of being overweight or developing health issues such as diabetes or musculoskeletal disorders than other children. But researchers say that video games such as those found on Nintendo’s Wii can provide an opportunity to promote light to moderate physical activity in children with CP, and may even have a role to play in rehabilitation therapy. Their research was published online today in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

“Active video games (AVG) provide a low-cost, commercially available system that can be strategically selected to address specific therapeutic goals,” says lead investigator Elaine Biddiss, PhD, of Toronto’s Bloorview Research Institute at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, and the University of Toronto, Canada. “While our results did not show that AVG game play can be regarded as a replacement for more vigorous physical activity or muscle strengthening, we found that some games may provide targeted therapy focused on specific joints or movements.”

Microsoft’s Kinect Being Employed to Help Detect Autism Early

Microsoft’s Kinect Being Employed to Help Detect Autism Early

Kinect might not be the greatest way to play video games, despite its introduction via the Xbox (unless you really, really like dancing), but the technology is still being unraveled as more and more uses are found for the device.

The movement and voice sensing systems of the Kinect have found a great many uses through unofficial “hacks,” which Microsoftactually encourages. From 3D object scan to asurgery aide, new uses for the Kinect are still being discovered.

This one caught my eye however, as a new study is attempting to  use Kinect to detect early signs of autism in children with its motion sensing capabilities. The project is by researchers at the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Child Development in Minneapolis.

A nursery was fitted with five Kinect sensors that were set to monitor a group of 3-5 year old children. Each child was tracked by the colors they were wearing, and their movement patterns were fed into a bank of computers that would use an algorithm to recognize if they were being hyperactive or unusually still, which could indicate  possible autism.